Browsing: What to Read

Could You Love Your Neighbor As Much As You Love Your Kids?

“Donovan Campbell is a decorated military officer and a young Fortune 500 executive whose lessons about leadership and teamwork came the hard way, through three combat deployments—two in Iraq and one in Afghanistan.” ~RHSpeakers.com I recently had the privilege of sharing the stage with Donovan Campbell. And I was struck by his description of true […]


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To Sell is Human

You probably wouldn’t expect me to kick off 2013 by recommending a book about sales, but I’ve found that pretty much everything bestselling author Dan Pink writes is funny and fascinating. So too his just-released book, TO SELL IS HUMAN: The Surprising Truth About Moving Others. This is not a book about sleazy car-dealer sales […]


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A Meditation for the Weekend: How the Light Gets In

Ring the bells that still can ring Forget your perfect offering There is a crack in everything That’s how the light gets in. –Leonard Cohen, from “Anthem”


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What to Read This Weekend (The Great Ward Sutton, and the Latest from the Quiet Media Blitz)

Hi everyone, Writing this from the plane — I’m finally returning to my family after a few days on the West Coast. If you were in the San Francisco airport early this morning, I was the one hauling gigantic, bleeping, honking toy garbage trucks through the terminal. The batteries from this trip’s batch of presents […]


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Rise of the Introverts: Courtesy of CBS News

Oh, the irony of being an introvert on book tour! Yesterday I gave TWENTY-ONE interviews, starting at 6:45 a.m. and concluding at 10 p.m. Today wasn’t much different. This is not an ideal scenario for someone who dislikes the spotlight. But for now, I’m in a state of awe and delight. The QUIET Revolution appears to […]


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Three Ways to Celebrate the Quiet Revolution

Hi everyone, Today is launch day! Six years in the making, my book QUIET: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking, is finally being released into the world. Please join me in the grand unleashing of the QUIET Revolution. To mark the occasion, here are three ways to celebrate: 1) Take […]


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The Rise of the New Groupthink

  I just published a new New York Times piece on the “Rise of  the New Groupthink” (currently the #1 most emailed article!) — arguing that collaboration is in, but is not always conducive to creativity. What do you think? Please discuss here! (The accompanying artwork was done by Andy Rementer at the Times, and […]


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What to Read/Listen to this Weekend

Hi everyone, Longtime readers of this blog know that I’ve been crazy about TED talks from the moment I discovered them a few years ago. So I am incredibly honored to announce that I’ve been invited to give a TED talk on introversion this February, at the TED conference in Long Beach, California! To mark […]


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Reading Ideas for the Weekend: Signs of a Quiet Revolution

Hi everyone, For this weekend, I’d like to share the signs I see everywhere of a QUIET Revolution. Here are three particularly interesting ones, in written form: 1. “The Joy of Quiet,” by Pico Iyer: Wildly popular essay in the New York Times by the always-thoughtful Iyer. 2. “Solitude and Leadership,” by William Deresiewicz: One […]


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Life is Beautiful, and Other Weekend Music

Hi everyone, For the holiday weekend, here are three music picks to make you step lightly: 1. Me Gustas Tu, by my long-time favorite Manu Chao. If you’ve never heard of Manu Chao before, you’re going to be really thrilled to discover him. 2.”Life is Beautiful,” by the lovely singer-songwriter Amy Correia. 3. The book […]


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Reading/Listening Ideas for the Weekend

Hi everyone, here are this week’s reading and listening suggestions: 1. “The Glory of Oprah,” by Caitlin Flanagan: I realize this pick may surprise you, but Flanagan is one of those writers whose words jump off the page, and this Atlantic magazine essay on Oprah’s life and times is a fascinating read. 2. Schubert’s Fantasy […]


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Reading and Listening Ideas for the Weekend: Creative Thinking, the Children’s Gate, and Storm Large

Hi everyone, Here are this week’s reading and listening picks: 1. Twelve Things You Were Not Taught in School About Creative Thinking, by Michael Michalko: Thought-provoking article. Here’s a sample: Creative thinking is work. …All creative geniuses work passionately hard and produce incredible numbers of ideas, most of which are bad. In fact, more bad poems […]


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What to Read and Listen to This Weekend: Writers, Inventors, and Pink Martini

1. Una Notte a Napoli, by Pink Martini: Music guaranteed to make you happy. If you’re not familiar with Pink Martini, check them out immediately. 13 piece orchestra singing music across many languages and genres. Lush, sophisticated, and presided over by the world’s most unassuming diva, China Forbes (that’s her in the ballgown up top). […]


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What to Read This Weekend: Five Quotes to Make You Think

Hi everyone, for this weekend’s reading selection, here are five mind-expanding quotes from the great mythologist Joseph Campbell: 1. “The cave you fear to enter holds the treasure you seek.” 2. “Half the people in the world think that the metaphors of their religious traditions, for example, are facts. And the other half contends that […]


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What to Read/Watch This Weekend: All Things John Hodgman

This post is in honor of the release of writer, storyteller, and comedian John Hodgman’s new book, “That is All” — which is a funny thing, because I haven’t actually read it yet. It’s not available electronically, and my hard copy won’t arrive ’til Tuesday. But if you’ve never read John Hodgman or heard him […]


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What to Watch This Weekend: Teresa Amabile, Billy Collins, and Sarah Kay

Hi everyone, Here are this week’s viewing picks: 1. Teresa Amabile, on the psychology of everyday work life: Harvard Business School professor Amabile is one of the nation’s deepest thinkers on creativity at work. 2. Billy Collins, reading aloud one of his best poems, “The Lanyard“: If you’re a mother, or ever had a mother, you’ll […]


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What to Read This Weekend: featuring Gish Jen, Michael Lewis, and Victor Frankl

Hi everyone, Here are this week’s reading picks: 1.”My Muse was an Apple Computer,” by Gish Jen: another tribute to Steve Jobs, but also a compelling account of the life of a writer. 2. “Betting on the Blind Side,” by Michael Lewis: I’m reading Michael Lewis’ new book, Boomerang, which reminds me of how much […]


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What To Read This Weekend: UNCERTAINTY

For this week’s picks, I offer you three great reads on the theme of Uncertainty: 1. UNCERTAINTY: Turning Fear and Doubt Into Fuel for Brilliance: This is a terrific new book by my friend Jonathan Fields: thinker, writer, blogger, and mensch. Jonathan tells his own story of uncertainty — how he gave up a generous […]


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Really Great Reading Ideas for the Weekend

Hi everyone, Here are this week’s recommendations: 1. The Rationality Project: One Man’s Quest to Ignore His Gut Instinct, by A.J. Jacobs: I defy you to read this without laughing out loud. 2. How I Know I Love My Wife, by Steven Levitt (of Freakonomics fame): I defy you to read/watch this without tearing up. […]


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A Reading Idea for the Weekend

Here’s something you don’t know about me. I am crazy about home décor. Actually, even if you lived right next door to me, or in my own house for that matter, you wouldn’t know this, because for the past few years I’ve been pregnant with babies and books and had no time to think about […]


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Reading (and Viewing) Ideas for the Weekend: Parisians, Women, and Spies

Hi everyone, Here are this weekend’s reading (and viewing) picks: 1. “Being a Man at Blogher,” by Wolf Pascoe: Very funny account of what it’s like to be the lone man at a conference of women bloggers. (Hat tip to RealDelia.com.) 2.  Adam Gopnik, on Parisians: Adam Gopnik is one of those writers who is […]


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Reading Ideas for the Weekend: Steve Jobs, Young Heretics, and Why Love is the Opposite of Underwear

Hi everyone, Here are this week’s reading picks for the weekend: 1. Glenn Kelman on Steve Jobs, the Poet: “I still remember exactly where I was, standing in a Dolores Street apartment with a cereal bowl in my hand, when [Steve Jobs] came on TV to say a competitor had no poetry. It made me […]


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Three Steps to a Rich Inner Life — at Work

Would you like to read a business book that focuses on the inner life? Then take a look at THE PROGRESS PRINCIPLE: Using Small Wins To Ignite Joy, Engagement, and Creativity at Work, by Harvard Business School professor Teresa Amabile, who is herself an introvert, and known for her pathbreaking work on creativity. Amabile and […]


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Reading Ideas For The Weekend: You Become What You Pretend to Be, and More

Hi everyone, here are this week’s reading picks for you: 1. “You Become What You Pretend to Be“: Here is a great read on how our behavior influences our attitudes. (Or, as my friend Gretchen Rubin of the Happiness Project would put it, “Act the way you want to feel.”) I use this trick occasionally, […]


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Reading for the Weekend

Hi everyone, In lieu of my usual reading suggestions for the weekend, here is a passage from Gilead, by Marilynne Robinson, which we’ll be discussing this Tuesday in the inaugural session of the Quiet Online Book Club. “I went up to the church to watch the dawn come, because that peace does restore me better […]


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Book Club Reminder: We’ll Be Discussing “Gilead” This Tuesday!

Hi everyone, just a reminder that the first meeting of the Quiet Online Book Club will take place this coming Tuesday, August 16, from 8 to 9 pm E.S.T., on my Facebook page (log-in instructions to come). I’m really excited about this event and hope that as many of you can join as possible. It […]


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Reading/Viewing Ideas for the Weekend: An Intellectual Hero, Islands for Introverts, and Teddy Roosevelt on Fear

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Reading Ideas for the Weekend: Stage Fright in Hollywood, A Golden Age for Introverts, and More

Hi everyone, Here are some reading picks for the weekend: 1. New Study Investigates Stage Fright in Elite Actors: This is an article describing interesting research on 136 elite actors. One key takeaway: “The things we normally think might affect stage fright simply don’t. Confidence was the only predictive variable…Professional status, experience, success, age, or […]


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Reading Ideas for the Weekend

Hi everyone, here are some “reading” ideas for the weekend, “reading” in quotes, because this week I offer you two speeches and one quotation: 1.  “A Kinder, Gentler Philosophy of Success“: I’ve been on an Alain de Botton kick lately. I love to listen to him speak and think on just about any topic — this […]


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The Quiet Book Club Selection Votes Are In, and the Winner Is…

Gilead, by Marilynne Robinson! Last Thursday, I asked you to vote on which of three books you’d like to read for the first meeting of the Quiet Online Book Club. Thank you so much for your enthusiastic response. The results were: Gilead, by Marilynne Robinson: 29 votes Super Sad True Love Story, by Gary Shteyngart: […]


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Reading Ideas For the Weekend

Hi everyone, here are this week’s reading picks: 1. Move Over, Alpha Males. Why Being a Beta May Be Better (At Least for Baboons): Fascinating piece at Time Magazine Healthland, by my friend Maia Szalavitz, on new study finding that beta baboons are healthier and suffer less stress than alphas. My favorite bit is near […]


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Reading Ideas for the Weekend: The Inside Story of a Very Shy and Very Brave Photographer (and more)

  Hi everyone, before I get to this week’s reading recommendations, I first want to say thanks for the overwhelmingly enthusiastic response to the QUIET Revolution projects idea. Look for a kick-off of the public speaking project next week! And here are three picks for the weekend. 1. How to Spot a Narcissist: An interesting […]


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My Mother’s Lover: Reading Ideas for the Weekend

Hi everyone. Here’s a must-read for the weekend: “My Mother’s Lover,” by David Dobbs. It’s the true story of a World War II love affair that Dobbs’ mother kept secret, until she left her kids a puzzle on her deathbed. This is a short e-book/long story, and you have to buy it via Kindle or […]


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Why Reading Makes You Self-Confident

One of the luckiest things that ever happened to me was being born into a family that elevated reading to a religious activity. The weekly trip to the library was a form of Sabbath observance in our house. Then there was the yearly pilgrimage to London, which we visited with an empty suitcase reserved for […]


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What to Read This Weekend: The End of Solitude

This week I am recommending one gorgeous essay by the always-thoughtful William Deresiewicz. It’s called “The End of Solitude.” Here’s a teaser: If boredom is the great emotion of the TV generation, loneliness is the great emotion of the Web generation. They have lost the ability to be alone, their capacity for solitude. And losing solitude, […]


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What To Read This Weekend: The School of Life (Ideas to Live By)

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What to Read This Weekend (Three Love Letters to the Literary Life)

Hi everyone, For this holiday weekend, I offer you three love letters to the literary life: 1.  “To England,” by Richard Brautigan. (Thanks to my father for introducing me to this poem many, many moons ago.) To England There are no postage stamps that send letters back to England three centuries ago, no postage stamps […]


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What to Read This Weekend: Elizabeth Gilbert on Creativity, Wesley Yang on Paper Tigers, and Wendell Berry on Quiet

Hi everyone, Here are this week’s reading picks. 1. Elizabeth Gilbert, on nurturing creativity: OK, so this is not really something to read. It’s the author of Eat, Pray, Love (which I have never read, actually, but I plan to now) delivering a TED talk on creativity.  Absolutely mesmerizing. There’s a transcript available if you […]


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What to Read This Weekend: The P.C. Guy, 15 Minutes of Facebook Fame, and a Garden of (Nazi) Beasts

Hi everyone, here are this week’s reading picks: 1. “Apologia To My Second Child“: Witty and poignant letter to his unborn second child, written by quiet guy John Hodgman (otherwise known as the fellow who played a P.C. in the hilarious Apple “Get a Mac” ad campaigns.) 2. “The (Shy) Woman Whose Words Accidentally Became […]


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What to Read This Weekend: A Mother’s Secrets, Presentation Zen, and Writing Well

Hi everyone, Here are this weekend’s reading suggestions: 1. “Sharing Her Secrets“: Beautifully written New York Times essay by Katie Roiphe, about her mother’s bohemian youth in mid-century New York. (Hat tip to Delia Lloyd of the always amusing Real Delia blog.) 2. Presentation Zen blog, by Garr Reynolds: Presentation Zen was the first thing to […]


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What to Read This Weekend: Tiger Moms (not what you think), Pretty Young Things, and Confessions of an Introverted Traveler

Here are this Friday’s suggestions for weekend reading, all of them from writers I have long admired: 1. Sympathy for the Tiger Moms: If you think you’ve already gotten enough of the Tiger Mom debate, you haven’t read Sandra Tsing Loh, a writer for The Atlantic magazine. Plus, this is a great excuse to get […]


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What to Read This Weekend: Why Nice Baboons Finish First, Leadership Requires Solitude, and Humans are Naturally Empathic

Hi everyone, Here are this weekend’s reading suggestions: 1. “Solitude and Leadership”: This brilliant essay by William Deresiewicz was just nominated for a National Magazine Award. It was adapted from a speech the author gave to the plebe class at West Point, and argues that leadership and moral courage require quiet contemplation. It also says […]


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What To Read This Weekend: Steal Like an Artist, Test Your Empathy Quotient, and Raise an Orchid Child

Hi everyone! Here are this week’s picks of the best of the Web, from a cerebral introvert’s perspective: 1.  The Science of Success: This is not just this week’s pick, but really one of the most important and illuminating pieces I’ve read in the last year. In this Atlantic magazine article, author David Dobbs explains […]


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Hello to U.K. Readers, and to My Childhood Self

Do you ever wish you could go back in time to tell your childhood self that its dreams would actually come true? I’ve just finalized my book tour dates with my UK publisher, Viking/Penguin. I’ll be in London and environs the week of March 19, 2012.  U.K readers, I would love to meet as many […]


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What To Read This Weekend

1. The Magicians, a novel by Lev Grossman. I’m halfway through it as I write this, and loving every minute. The Magicians is a fantasy novel for grown-ups — one reviewer said that it is to Harry Potter as a shot of Irish whiskey is to a glass of weak tea. I haven’t enjoyed fantasy […]


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What To Read This Weekend

Hi everyone, here are this Friday’s reading recommendations: 1.  Fern Hill, by Dylan Thomas. One of the most beautiful and poignant poems ever to grace the English language. Even if you’ve read it before, take another look. It never fails to delight. 2.  “The Power of Lonely,” by Leon Neyfakh. A thoughtful reader pointed me […]


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Do You Read Enough Fiction?

For the last few years, about 90% of my reading diet has been non-fiction, most of it about human nature. Three of my favorite books are: Jonathan Haidt’s The Happiness Hypothesis, which I recommended last week; How We Decide, by Jonah Lehrer (a “popular neuroscience” writer, if there is such a thing), and Flow, by […]


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What to Read This Weekend

1.  One of my all-time favorite books is Jonathan Haidt’s The Happiness Hypothesis, which explores how the mind works and what makes life worthwhile.  Some of the chapters are available on Haidt’s website for free! Here they are. 2. This is a very smart article on how to become a better conversationalist. 3.  Have you […]


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Quiet: The Book

- Wall Street Journal

Wow!
Best Nonfiction Book of 2012

QUIET has been voted the best nonfiction book of 2012
by Goodreads.com

Manifesto

1. There’s a word for “people who are in their heads too much”: thinkers.

2. Our culture rightly admires risk-takers, but we need our “heed-takers” more than ever.

3. Solitude is a catalyst for innovation.

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