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Topic: Vow of Silence
Zefareu
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Posts: 2
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Vow of Silence
on: Apr 19, 2012, 6:39pm

When I think about being in an environment where verbal communication is non-existant, I can't help but smile. I don't particularly like verbal communication, and I include my own voice in that aversion. I've thought lots about a retreat of some sort, a vacation of silence, where I could just not speak or be spoken to. If I were of a religious mind, I'd possibly become a monk!


DC1346
Member
Posts: 5
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Re: Vow of Silence
on: Aug 24, 2012, 11:05pm

I once went on a photo safari to Zimbabwe and Botswana with a group of strangers. Our first night was spent camping on the Khalahari Plain. It was quite picturesque. There we were, camped amidst a small grove of trees. We sat in folding chairs around a roaring fire. In the distance we could hear the call of birds and the occasional giggle of a hyena … and there I was with a pair of retired university professors who wanted to spend the night guzzling wine and talking.


After THREE HOURS of incessant talking, they finally noticed that I hadn't said a word. "Don't you have anything to say?" asked one of the professors. "Why don't you choose a topic for conversation?"


"Could we just enjoy a moment of silence?" I asked. "Could we just enjoy the crackling of the flames?"


The others looked at each other, rolled their eyes, and immediately began another conversation. (sigh)


The picture safari lasted 4 long weeks. It felt like 4 years.


Towards the end, I broke away from the group and spent the last week at a travel lodge on the Okavango. I had a private bungalow complete with a bed covered by mosquito netting along with a private bath. Meals were served on white linen covered tablecloths by servers in spotless white jackets. By day, I had access to a private guide who could take me out in a land rover or on a motorboat.


It was heavenly. The guide didn't say a word other than to ask me where I wanted to go.


Surprisingly enough, after returning to the group for our departure via Victoria Falls, the others in the party wouldn't speak to me. I suppose I was being punished for having left the group but to me, their affronted silence was simply another blessing.


Chef Instructor

fda
Member
Posts: 1
 Forum
Re: Vow of Silence
on: Feb 9, 2013, 6:38pm

If by any chance you happen or plan to organise another trip …


please let me know… I'll be more than happy to join you..


Why would one go to the other side of the planet to listen to the same voices that could be heard at home??


Quote from DC1346 on Aug 24, 2012, 11:05pm

I once went on a photo safari to Zimbabwe and Botswana with a group of strangers. Our first night was spent camping on the Khalahari Plain. It was quite picturesque. There we were, camped amidst a small grove of trees. We sat in folding chairs around a roaring fire. In the distance we could hear the call of birds and the occasional giggle of a hyena … and there I was with a pair of retired university professors who wanted to spend the night guzzling wine and talking.


After THREE HOURS of incessant talking, they finally noticed that I hadn't said a word. "Don't you have anything to say?" asked one of the professors. "Why don't you choose a topic for conversation?"


"Could we just enjoy a moment of silence?" I asked. "Could we just enjoy the crackling of the flames?"


The others looked at each other, rolled their eyes, and immediately began another conversation. (sigh)


The picture safari lasted 4 long weeks. It felt like 4 years.


Towards the end, I broke away from the group and spent the last week at a travel lodge on the Okavango. I had a private bungalow complete with a bed covered by mosquito netting along with a private bath. Meals were served on white linen covered tablecloths by servers in spotless white jackets. By day, I had access to a private guide who could take me out in a land rover or on a motorboat.


It was heavenly. The guide didn't say a word other than to ask me where I wanted to go.


Surprisingly enough, after returning to the group for our departure via Victoria Falls, the others in the party wouldn't speak to me. I suppose I was being punished for having left the group but to me, their affronted silence was simply another blessing.



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