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Topic: Public speaking
soquiet
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Public speaking
on: Sep 3, 2012, 4:48pm

This book was one of the most personally validating and comforting books I've ever read, and I want everyone who has ever regarded extroversion as inherently "better" than its opposite to read it.


What surprised me most though was the view of public speaking she depicts as being typical of introverts. Personally, I have always enjoyed giving prepared, formal spoken presentations in front of groups and thought this was a hallmark of the introvert identity: I actually do have a lot to say on account of doing so much listening and thinking, but I like getting to prepare as much as I need to before saying it, I don't like having to fight other people for the chance to say it, and I like getting to finish when I'm done instead of when someone feels like interrupting. Since childhood I've looked forward to (prepared) public speaking opportunities because I felt people could finally see the "real" me, where I can be articulate and funny, say what I'm truly thinking after putting a lot of thought into what I'm going to say.


Can anyone else relate? Is there a different category for this aspect of personality?


Red Dog
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Posts: 199
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Re: Public speaking
on: Sep 4, 2012, 12:01am

Quote from soquiet on Sep 3, 2012, 4:48pm


What surprised me most though was the view of public speaking she depicts as being typical of introverts. Personally, I have always enjoyed giving prepared, formal spoken presentations in front of groups and thought this was a hallmark of the introvert identity: I actually do have a lot to say on account of doing so much listening and thinking, but I like getting to prepare as much as I need to before saying it, I don't like having to fight other people for the chance to say it, and I like getting to finish when I'm done instead of when someone feels like interrupting. Since childhood I've looked forward to (prepared) public speaking opportunities because I felt people could finally see the "real" me, where I can be articulate and funny, say what I'm truly thinking after putting a lot of thought into what I'm going to say.


Can anyone else relate? Is there a different category for this aspect of personality?


IMHO, you are absolutely correct. But there is no "different category". Again and again in this forum I see people linking problems they might have to introversion, and assuming that all sorts of individual problems stem from being introverted. Not to disparage Susan, but she has presented the same sort of assumption: since she has a phobia or anxiety about public speaking, she assumed that that is an inevitable attribute of introversion. Actually it isn't. Doing so amounts to confusing causality with correlation.


That which you are describing is very insightful, in that acquiring the art of public speaking is a learned skill, or a performance art. I learned to do it in my graduate classes in preparation for my master's degree. Several times per semester the assignment was to prepare and give a lecture to our fellow classmates on a topic of our choice that we needed to research thoroughly. It was then presented orally to our classmates for more than 30 minutes who asked follow up questions after the presentation. If you did your homework and were thoroughly well prepared and well versed in the topic, it was not very difficult to recount what you knew, for you knew more about that topic than anyone else in the room. It gave us the practice we needed to pass an oral dissertation for a PhD. or to teach a class at the graduate level or more. Preparation and practice are necessary components of attaining confidence. Once one gains confidence, any anxiety is reduced or eliminated, if for no other reason than by needing to concentrate on the task at hand instead of worrying what one's audience may think.


But I remain very introverted and I always will be, for that I cannot change – nor would I want to. It is a part of my personality and as such it defines who I am. icon smile Forum


McFeist
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Posts: 2
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Re: Public speaking
on: Jan 19, 2013, 3:21pm

Quote from soquiet on Sep 3, 2012, 4:48pm


What surprised me most though was the view of public speaking she depicts as being typical of introverts. Personally, I have always enjoyed giving prepared, formal spoken presentations in front of groups and thought this was a hallmark of the introvert identity: I actually do have a lot to say on account of doing so much listening and thinking, but I like getting to prepare as much as I need to before saying it, I don't like having to fight other people for the chance to say it, and I like getting to finish when I'm done instead of when someone feels like interrupting. Since childhood I've looked forward to (prepared) public speaking opportunities because I felt people could finally see the "real" me, where I can be articulate and funny, say what I'm truly thinking after putting a lot of thought into what I'm going to say.


Can anyone else relate? Is there a different category for this aspect of personality?


I know this is an old post, but I am just now reading the book and just discovered this forum. I have taken a few public speaking classes in the course of college and graduate school, and I was surprised to find out that I actually do very well at it. You articulated very well why I think that is – as an introvert I struggle with off-the-cuff conversation, but I prepare well and give well-thought-out and organized presentations.


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