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Topic: Teaching techniques for introverts
lyndaweinman
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Teaching techniques for introverts
on: Mar 27, 2012, 12:13am

Would anyone on this forum care to share teaching techniques and activities that a groomed for the introverted student? It seems that asynchronous activities are part of the solution – does anyone have any good stories as a teacher or a student that describe an agreeable curriculum or teaching practice?


lrudolph
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Re: Teaching techniques for introverts
on: Apr 1, 2012, 8:08pm

This is something I do to foster the learning environment for the introverted student and I learned it from personal experience. I am a parent and first grade teacher. Fifteen years ago I walked by my daughter’s first grade classroom and saw her sitting off by herself and thought she was in time-out for misbehaving. When I asked her about it she said no she had asked if she could sit by herself because she liked working alone. I then started thinking about the students in my own class who might want to work in a quiet space versus working in a group setting. This led me to establish several quiet seats in my classroom. I put desks in remote nooks and corners and I have about five of these that students can go to when they need a quiet place to work. I have been doing this for twelve years. It is great. At first I put up signs on the desks that said Quiet Seat 1, etc. so visiting adults wouldn’t think I was putting so many of the students in time-out. Now that I have been doing it for years it has become a part of my classroom environment. I have group settings for students and quiet settings as well. It has been very effective.


DC1346
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Posts: 5
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Re: Teaching techniques for introverts
on: Aug 24, 2012, 12:22pm

I was an elementary teacher for 17 years. I have now been a chef instructor for 6 years.


What are some teaching techniques for introverted students?


1) Use self instruction modules. With the advent of computer technology, this is a lot easier than the color coded cards I remember using for math and reading when I was an elementary student back in the 60's. Nowadays we have computer assisted instruction that can present instructional modules with quizzes to monitor comprehension.


2) Independent Projects. As an elementary teacher, I assigned book reports, social studies research projects, and science fair projects. As a chef instructor, last year I had some of my advanced students create individual cakes. Inspired by the Food Network's Cake Boss series, students created their own designer cakes using layered sponge cakes with butter cream frosting, fondant, modeling chocolate, and rice krispy treats.


Chef Instructor

show
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Re: Teaching techniques for introverts
on: Aug 24, 2012, 4:12pm

I was interested in the part about Susan's book where she said that writing was a good way for introverts to express themselves. As an adult, I agree, but I never really learned to write in school/college since the writing classes all involved having to read one's own work out loud. I would have preferred death, so I dropped English classes altogether.


I then had a job at an English language newspaper in a foreign country, editing the work of non-native writers. It was a perfect way to become a better writer– by editing others' work– not my own. When the personal aspect of writing was removed, I could do it. When it required me to go public, I could not. I still have a hard time reading my own writing, and certainly would still not ever want to read it out loud (even to myself!).


So teachers, please, do not require students to read their writing out loud. There are other ways to learn to write. Use text that are not written by anyone in the class or anyone the students know.


jaycee
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Posts: 3
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Re: Teaching techniques for introverts
on: Dec 16, 2012, 8:24pm

I believe that offering choice is important. There needs to be independent activities, as well as partner and group work settings. As a teacher, I structure different work arrangements, depending on the learning goal I have set for that lesson or project.


As much as introverts would prefer to work on their own, life will inevitably require them to, at times, work with others. It is important that they have opportunities to develop strategies to work and cope in these less than ideal settings. Knowing that there is a balance of independent, partner and group activities will hopefully make working in pairs and groups less daunting.


Professor Roger Breen
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Posts: 3
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Re: Teaching techniques for introverts
on: Feb 5, 2013, 7:14pm

Just a thought. Let the thinkers think, and the talkers talk. Then ask them to share in written form, as a PowerPoint or as a video.


BS Boston College English; MA Teachers College C.U. Mathematics
13 years junior high teacher in English and mathematics
37 years mathematics professor FSCJ, Jacksonville, FL
MBTI in 1978 ISTJ, IN 1990 and currently ENTJ
Trained in Cooperative Learning, Paideia Seminars, NLP Basic
Master Teacher Seminar facilitator

Rowie
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Posts: 2
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Re: Teaching techniques for introverts
on: Mar 24, 2013, 3:48pm

This week in a high school where I do literacy consulting, I simply shared the premise of Susan's book with my students. I told the kids that after 30 years of teaching and ten years of consulting, the book has changed my views on classroom participation. I told the kids I was re-exmining my work and would make an effort to meet the needs of all of my students. As I spoke, I could see the "quiet ones" smiling, as I acknowledged that I,too, am an introvert. Just "putting it out there" can positively change the trust and tone in a classroom.


As long as no one gets hurt, and the electricity stays on, I have always craved rain, snow, ice storms, high winds, and, if we had them in NY, dust storms. When I was little, I’d crawl under the sheet I draped over the bridge table and hide out in my tent. Now, that I’m much older, I just close the front door, listen to the storm, and my own thoughts.

Ting
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Posts: 1
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Re: Teaching techniques for introverts
on: May 29, 2013, 1:34pm

To ensure there is a balance of introvert and extrovert activities as well as a variety of activities so I personally do not get bored of teaching these are some things I have done. Though its usually more about entertaining myself…


Discussions:


1. Pose a question, get students to answer individually on a piece of paper, then get them to discuss their answers in groups, this provides a structure for everyone to participate in a group setting and formulate ideas individually while still pertaining to every type of personality. Then we discuss the ideas as a class to close to activity.


2. Set the class up with an IRC channel or a online chatroom. I used mibbit.com cause it is easy to use. Ensure your students are mature to some degree, and instead of discussing vocally to the entire class try discussing virtually on the IRC channel. This is quite interesting as the results vary differently depending on the topic and students.


This is a bit risky because if there is a student who likes to be… too smart for their own good… the internet will happen, and trolling, swearing, private parts, might arise and disrupt everything. There are four ways to deal with it, one is to just shut it all down, second is to ignore it, third to is moderate it, forth is to use it as a learning opportunity and teach students how to act properly on the internet.


3. Use an online whiteboard, i use twiddla, getting studets to participate through it in a similar way to IRC channels but this time people can draw. Beware of the "trees" that look like something else but other than that having a visual aspect to the discussion is great if you are doing a more visual topic such as the digestive system, or photosynthesis.


Group Projects/Presentations:

1. Assign specific roles to individuals, each pertaining to either a single topic or a process. They can then work individually on their own part and put it all together, or work together throughout the whole thing.


2. Give self designed projects, let the students create their own groups or work individually, let them design their own project as well as their topic (that is relevant to the course)They create their own marking rubrics, write up a proposal and you give the OK. This provides students to learn what they want, in a way they want, and presenting it to you (or if they desire to the class) what they learned. Giving students this freedom might scare them at first, because they were never given so much control, but with a bit of a nudge it is doable.


3. For group presentations break it down, get each individual to talk about a specific section and have one person do the q/a. This allows students to talk about their own section comfortably, and create a structure for student interaction.


4. Create videos instead of presentations. Seriously everyone has a smartphone. They can record their presentation and show it to the class. This will be much more interesting as it is a video, and students can do a lot of other things with it. From special effects to stunts and props they normally cant show. Having the perfect setting to work in, etc. Afterwards just do a quick q/a and your good to go. One person usually does the filming and directing, while the others do all the action. You can force it by saying everyone needs to be in the film if you want results are just going to be just as entertaining.


5. Get students to create one of those drawing scribbling videos like khan academy or minute physics on youtube. Then presenting that would be significantly more interesting and fun. Some people may be a bit scared due to lack of artistic talent, but with a good amount of planning and a good amount of retakes and video editing it comes out either horridly or awesomely.


Just some of the stuff I have done, all quite interesting, some more fun to watch than others. They will work depending on your group of students, your teaching style, and maybe the subject your teaching.


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1. There’s a word for “people who are in their heads too much”: thinkers.

2. Our culture rightly admires risk-takers, but we need our “heed-takers” more than ever.

3. Solitude is a catalyst for innovation.

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