Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, Updated: Security, Health, Growth & Purpose

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Abraham Maslow
In 1943 Abraham Maslow published "A Theory of Human Motivation", proposing what he thought to be the most necessary elements humans needed in order to lead successful, healthy, happy lives.

A lot has changed in the world since 1943. So Charlie Kim, Founder and CEO at Next Jump, took it upon himself to modernize Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs. Here is Charlie's version:

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Shyness Remains a Part of Being Human

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Joe Moran explores why shyness is a fundamental part of humanity:

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I don’t fear death (except when I do)

23 Comments » Here’s a brief musing I tapped out on my phone last night while reading from the Book of Ecclesiastes: I don’t know why everyone talks about the fear of death. I love life, but I don’t fear death. What I fear is the deaths of the people I love best — because I fear the […]

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Are Sexism — and the Extrovert Ideal — Clouding the Federal Reserve’s Search for a New Chairman?

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It seems that the Federal Reserve has managed to offend both women and introverts as they search for a new Chairman, according to this piece by Ezra Klein:

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Jane Austen & Bank of England Declare: ‘…there is no enjoyment like reading!’

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Jane-Austen-ten-pound-noteJane Austen, world renowned English author, had a particular talent for writing developed characters, many of them introverts. Beginning in 2016, 200 years after her novels were published, "good quiet Aunt Jane" -- as described by her family and friends who understood her private, introverted nature -- will be celebrated, quite publicly, on the reverse of the Bank of England's new 10-pound note.

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“Courage does not always roar. Sometimes courage is…”

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Mary Anne Radmacher, author, artist and professional speaker, illustrates her personal definition of courage:

“Courage does not always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day, saying: I will try again tomorrow.”

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Illustration by: Mary Anne Radmacher

➤ Enjoy  more inspirational prints by @Mary Anne Radmacher @ Applied Insight.

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Why “no innovation happens with 10 people in a room.”

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c4314cb8cdbec4a737e40e40f388c881 e1375308060370 Why no innovation happens with 10 people in a room.

Illustration by: Keith Tatum

Paul English, co-founder of Kayak, on why “no innovation happens with 10 people in a room“:

“We’re known for having very small meetings, usually three people. There’s a little clicker for counting people that hangs on the main conference room door. The reason it’s there is to send a message to people that I care about this issue. If there’s a bunch of people in the room, I’ll stick my head in and say, ‘It takes 10 of you to decide this? There aren’t three of you smart enough to do this?’

I just hate design by consensus. No innovation happens with 10 people in a room. It’s very easy to be a critic and say why something won’t work. I don’t want that because new ideas are like these little precious things that can die very easily. Two or three people will nurture it, and make it stronger, give it a chance to see life.”


Original Article: Paul English, co-founder of Kayak, on Nurturing New Ideas ~ By Adam Bryant | NYTimes.com

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Quiet: The Book

- Wall Street Journal

Wow!
Bill Gates names "The Power of Introverts" one of his all-time favorite TED Talks.

Best Nonfiction Book of 2012

QUIET has been voted the best nonfiction book of 2012
by Goodreads.com

Manifesto

1. There’s a word for “people who are in their heads too much”: thinkers.

2. Our culture rightly admires risk-takers, but we need our “heed-takers” more than ever.

3. Solitude is a catalyst for innovation.

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